Buddhist philosophy and psychology

♦ Nāgārjuna on “cause” and “condition”: pars destruens (2)

Let us examine one by one the four alternatives listed by Nāgārjuna in his MMK I,1 (and referred to in Nāgārjuna on “cause” and “condition”: pars destruens (1)).1 (1) The alternative na svatas («not from itself») is clearly the rejection of the Sarvāstivāda-like position. Here Nāgārjuna criticizes the conception of svabhāvaḥ («intrinsic nature»). If the… Continue reading ♦ Nāgārjuna on “cause” and “condition”: pars destruens (2)

Buddhist philosophy and psychology

♦ Nāgārjuna on “cause” and “condition”: pars destruens (1)

As far as the causal and conditional dependence between effect and cause is concerned, we have to note that the conception of svabhāvaḥ, and consequently of parabhāvaḥ (as a preliminary discussion see A brief note on the distinction between “cause” and “condition” in early Buddhism), during Nāgārjuna’s times had developed some problematic aspects, which Nāgārjuna… Continue reading ♦ Nāgārjuna on “cause” and “condition”: pars destruens (1)

Buddhist philosophy and psychology

♦ A brief note on the distinction between “cause” and “condition” in early Buddhism

When we speak of “relation” in Buddhism, we mainly refer to what in Pāli language is called paṭicca-samuppādo, in Sanskrit pratītya-samutpādaḥ, and in Tibetan rten cing ’brel bar ’byung ba (or, in short, rten ’brel). The term pratītya-samutpādaḥ litterally means «conditioned co-production» or «dependent co-origination», and indicates the particular nature of the relation existing among… Continue reading ♦ A brief note on the distinction between “cause” and “condition” in early Buddhism

Buddhist philosophy and psychology · indica lingua

♦ manas and saññā: the non-meditative recognition of the impermanent and the not-self

The activity of saññā can be distinguished according to two acceptations, that is, in a “normal” state of consciousness and, in a state of meditation.1 Generally, compounds like anicca-saññā, «saññā concerning to what is impermanent»,2 anatta-saññā, «saññā concerning not-self»,3 etc. are used in passages in which the meditative aspect of saññā is involved but, of… Continue reading ♦ manas and saññā: the non-meditative recognition of the impermanent and the not-self

Buddhist philosophy and psychology · indica lingua

♦ How to recognize a feeling? Reflections on “being in touch”

According to the well-known Buddhist doctrine of conditional co-production (paṭicca-samuppāda), vedanā depends on contact (phassa) between senses and sense-objects, which stimulates the sensorial faculties. Now, we find that the Pāli Canon points out that also saññā, and not only vedanā, is conditioned, in its manifestation, by phassa. In Saṃyutta-Nikāya III, 59-60, indeed, we can read:… Continue reading ♦ How to recognize a feeling? Reflections on “being in touch”

Buddhist philosophy and psychology · indica lingua

♦ What object, what name… a brief note on saññā

In classical Sanskrit, among the several meanings of saṃjñā we find also «name». By virtue of its derivation from saṃ√jñā (litt. «to know together with», i.e., «to agree»), this term signifies also «agreement»: to have an agreement with someone necessitates, of course, the employment of the same way of communication, of the same way of… Continue reading ♦ What object, what name… a brief note on saññā