Buddhist philosophy and psychology · indica lingua

♦ manas and saññā: the non-meditative recognition of the impermanent and the not-self

The activity of saññā can be distinguished according to two acceptations, that is, in a “normal” state of consciousness and, in a state of meditation.1 Generally, compounds like anicca-saññā, «saññā concerning to what is impermanent»,2 anatta-saññā, «saññā concerning not-self»,3 etc. are used in passages in which the meditative aspect of saññā is involved but, of… Continue reading ♦ manas and saññā: the non-meditative recognition of the impermanent and the not-self

Buddhist philosophy and psychology · indica lingua

♦ How to recognize a feeling? Reflections on “being in touch”

According to the well-known Buddhist doctrine of conditional co-production (paṭicca-samuppāda), vedanā depends on contact (phassa) between senses and sense-objects, which stimulates the sensorial faculties. Now, we find that the Pāli Canon points out that also saññā, and not only vedanā, is conditioned, in its manifestation, by phassa. In Saṃyutta-Nikāya III, 59-60, indeed, we can read:… Continue reading ♦ How to recognize a feeling? Reflections on “being in touch”

Buddhist philosophy and psychology · indica lingua

♦ What object, what name… a brief note on saññā

In classical Sanskrit, among the several meanings of saṃjñā we find also «name». By virtue of its derivation from saṃ√jñā (litt. «to know together with», i.e., «to agree»), this term signifies also «agreement»: to have an agreement with someone necessitates, of course, the employment of the same way of communication, of the same way of… Continue reading ♦ What object, what name… a brief note on saññā