Buddhist Texts · Cārvāka/Lokāyata · indica lingua · lingua tibetica

♦ Where does the reference to lokāyatikas in Bhāviveka’s Tarkajvālā lead us?

During these last days I was reading Malcolm D. Eckel’s recent publication Bhāviveka and His Buddhist Opponents, which is an edition and translation of Chaperts 4 and 5 of the Madhyamakahṛdayakārikā and of Tarkajvālā commentary. In Chapter 5 of Tarkajvālā, ad Madhyamakahṛdayakārikā 5.83ab we find a reference to lokāyatikas which is, to my knowledge, the… Continue reading ♦ Where does the reference to lokāyatikas in Bhāviveka’s Tarkajvālā lead us?

Buddhist Texts · Cārvāka/Lokāyata · indica lingua

♦ The king as God: Cārvākas’ usage of a quite common expression

In the first chapter of Sāyaṇa-Mādhava’s Sarva-darśana-saṃgraha (on Cārvāka/Lokāyata) we meet with the following half-verse: lokasiddho bhaved rājā pareśo nāparaḥ smṛtaḥ |1 That is: The king (rājā), celebrated by the people (lokasiddho; also: powerful in the world, established in/by the world, etc.), is considered (bhaved smṛtaḥ; also: is declared, is admitted) [according to Cārvākas] the… Continue reading ♦ The king as God: Cārvākas’ usage of a quite common expression

Cārvāka/Lokāyata

♦ The Cārvāka Udbhaṭa Bhaṭṭa’s use of Vaiśeṣika vocabulary: the case of caitanya («self», «consciousness»)

Recently I had the opportunity to read with accuracy the fragments referring to Udbhaṭa Bhaṭṭa’s (or Bhaṭṭodbhaṭa’s) theory of consciousness, collected by Ramkrishna Bhattacharya in his Studies on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata (Ch. 6: Cārvāka Fragments: A New Collection). According to Udbhaṭa, who is a Materialist, consciousness (caitanya, a term which, for Cārvākas, means also «self») is… Continue reading ♦ The Cārvāka Udbhaṭa Bhaṭṭa’s use of Vaiśeṣika vocabulary: the case of caitanya («self», «consciousness»)

books · Cārvāka/Lokāyata

♦ Studies on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata

Book review: Studies on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata, by Ramkrishna Bhattacharya, Società Editrice Fiorentina/Manohar, Firenze 2009, pp. 254 ISBN 978-88-6032-113-8, € 28,00 (view editor book profile). ▪ The Preface of the book: «I started writing on the Cārvāka, the most uncompromising materialist school of philosophy in ancient India, from 1995 and have continued to work on its different aspects.… Continue reading ♦ Studies on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata